August 6th, 2013
Sisi’s Islamist Agenda for EgyptMany Egyptians fear that Fattah al-Sisi wants to return Egypt to a familiar style of secular authoritarianism. But his record suggests he may have very different — although equally undemocratic — political intentions: a hybrid regime that would combine Islamism with militarism.

Sisi’s Islamist Agenda for Egypt
Many Egyptians fear that Fattah al-Sisi wants to return Egypt to a familiar style of secular authoritarianism. But his record suggests he may have very different — although equally undemocratic — political intentions: a hybrid regime that would combine Islamism with militarism.

July 1st, 2013
Underneath all the anger in Egypt lies a basic fact: the economy is in deep trouble. Who will save it?

Underneath all the anger in Egypt lies a basic fact: the economy is in deep trouble. Who will save it?

June 28th, 2013
Egypt is unraveling. Meet the gangs, arms dealers, and vigilantes who are thriving: http://fam.ag/18kywv5

Egypt is unraveling. Meet the gangs, arms dealers, and vigilantes who are thriving: http://fam.ag/18kywv5

February 6th, 2013
Morsi’s Guns
Egypt is unsettled but not on the verge of another revolution. Certainly, the country’s unreformed security services have been cause for ongoing protest. But they will also ensure that those riots don’t get out of hand.

Morsi’s Guns

Egypt is unsettled but not on the verge of another revolution. Certainly, the country’s unreformed security services have been cause for ongoing protest. But they will also ensure that those riots don’t get out of hand.

February 5th, 2013
The urban poor and unemployed youth continue to take to the streets in Egypt.
Back Street’s Back
The protestors taking to Egypt’s streets are overwhelmingly male, urban, and destitute. They do not have the time or patience to wait for the democratic process to fix their country and its flailing economy. In desperation, they might usher in a second revolution — this one an uprising of the poor.

The urban poor and unemployed youth continue to take to the streets in Egypt.

Back Street’s Back

The protestors taking to Egypt’s streets are overwhelmingly male, urban, and destitute. They do not have the time or patience to wait for the democratic process to fix their country and its flailing economy. In desperation, they might usher in a second revolution — this one an uprising of the poor.

January 25th, 2013
Gallery: Revolution Graffiti
The 25 January Egyptian Revolution opened the floodgates for a wave of street art, which had been impossible under Mubarak’s regime, where the Ministry of Culture controlled all public expression. The eighteen days of mass revolts that finally toppled the stagnant regime of President Hosni Mubarak became an emotional earthquake for the country. Decades of oppression and despair suddenly were turned into optimism, a newborn vitality and energy, allowing people to explore new freedoms — including the right to make art freely.

Gallery: Revolution Graffiti

The 25 January Egyptian Revolution opened the floodgates for a wave of street art, which had been impossible under Mubarak’s regime, where the Ministry of Culture controlled all public expression. The eighteen days of mass revolts that finally toppled the stagnant regime of President Hosni Mubarak became an emotional earthquake for the country. Decades of oppression and despair suddenly were turned into optimism, a newborn vitality and energy, allowing people to explore new freedoms — including the right to make art freely.

January 25th, 2013
The Future of the Arab Spring
On the two-year anniversary of the Arab Spring protesters are taking to the streets again in Egypt. The debate about its successes and shortcomings persists. A look at both sides in our new issue.
The Mirage of the Arab Spring
The Promise of the Arab Spring

The Future of the Arab Spring

On the two-year anniversary of the Arab Spring protesters are taking to the streets again in Egypt. The debate about its successes and shortcomings persists. A look at both sides in our new issue.

The Mirage of the Arab Spring

The Promise of the Arab Spring

January 23rd, 2013
How Chemical Weapons Became Taboo: And Why Syria Won’t Overturn the Aversion
Today, it is taken for granted that using chemical weapons — as the Assad regime has reportedly done — is uniquely intolerable. Observers have speculated that humans simply harbor a particular fear of them or that militaries have never considered them useful. In fact, the proscription is the result of decades of international work.

How Chemical Weapons Became Taboo: And Why Syria Won’t Overturn the Aversion

Today, it is taken for granted that using chemical weapons — as the Assad regime has reportedly done — is uniquely intolerable. Observers have speculated that humans simply harbor a particular fear of them or that militaries have never considered them useful. In fact, the proscription is the result of decades of international work.

December 17th, 2012

Dirk Vandewalle on Libya after Qaddafi

Managing Editor Jonathan Tepperman interviews Dartmouth College professor Dirk Vandewalle on post-Qaddafi Libya, the ramifications of the attacks in Benghazi, and the lingering problem of rogue militias. Vandewalle discusses the surprising success of Libya’s nascent democracy, its progress in establishing new political institutions, and the country’s continuing challenges, all the while stressing the need for a U.S. role in North Africa.

September 13th, 2012
What Happened in Libya
A trove of essays from the last year examine NATO’s intervention in Libya, the fall of Muammar al-Qaddafi, the security mess that followed, and what lies ahead for the powder keg that the North African state has become. Read the full collection from Foreign Affairs.

What Happened in Libya

A trove of essays from the last year examine NATO’s intervention in Libya, the fall of Muammar al-Qaddafi, the security mess that followed, and what lies ahead for the powder keg that the North African state has become. Read the full collection from Foreign Affairs.

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