May 6th, 2013
Don’t underestimate cyber spies—even petty espionage can quickly escalate to a real attack. Read more.

Don’t underestimate cyber spies—even petty espionage can quickly escalate to a real attack. Read more.

June 22nd, 2012
Silicon Valley Needs a Foreign Policy
The United States is no longer all about cows (agriculture) or cars (manufacturing). So the tech industry has to step up and start shaping policy on immigration, trade, and free expression to ensure its competitiveness on the global stage.

Silicon Valley Needs a Foreign Policy

The United States is no longer all about cows (agriculture) or cars (manufacturing). So the tech industry has to step up and start shaping policy on immigration, trade, and free expression to ensure its competitiveness on the global stage.

May 15th, 2012

Teaching Theory vs. Policy (Or how to pitch an essay to Foreign Affairs)

What’s it like writing an essay for Foreign Affairs? Charli Carpenter just wrote the book blog post.

An Associate Professor of International Affairs at UMass-Amherst and Foreign Affairs author, Dr. Carpenter recently conducted an experiment in her doctoral level seminar on Human Security. She wanted to help her students navigate the theory vs. policy divide, and she did that by requiring students “to go through the process of convincing Foreign Affairs Magazine to publish their analysis of some policy-relevant topic…”

If you’re interested in the editorial process for a publication like Foreign Affairs or you just want to see an example for a successful pitch, this is a must-read. 

April 24th, 2012
All the President’s Central Bankers
Regardless of who wins the 2012 U.S. presidential election, President Barack Obama will end his first term having decisively shaped U.S. monetary policy for at least the next two decades. Thanks to lucky timing, by the end of 2012 Obama will have either appointed or reappointed every single one of the seven members of the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors, including its chairman, Ben Bernanke. With each governor set to serve a 14-year term, they will ensure Obama’s long-term impact on the U.S. economy.

All the President’s Central Bankers

Regardless of who wins the 2012 U.S. presidential election, President Barack Obama will end his first term having decisively shaped U.S. monetary policy for at least the next two decades. Thanks to lucky timing, by the end of 2012 Obama will have either appointed or reappointed every single one of the seven members of the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors, including its chairman, Ben Bernanke. With each governor set to serve a 14-year term, they will ensure Obama’s long-term impact on the U.S. economy.

April 23rd, 2012
A Farewell to Fossil Fuels — Answering the Energy ChallengeWith the costs of oil and coal rising, the United States needs to wean itself off fossil fuels, a goal best accomplished by making buildings and vehicles more efficient and switching to renewable power. The task might seem quixotic, but it actually will not require miracles — just the widespread application of existing technology.

A Farewell to Fossil Fuels — Answering the Energy Challenge
With the costs of oil and coal rising, the United States needs to wean itself off fossil fuels, a goal best accomplished by making buildings and vehicles more efficient and switching to renewable power. The task might seem quixotic, but it actually will not require miracles — just the widespread application of existing technology.

April 4th, 2012
Why Israel Should Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Bomb
The debate in Jerusalem about attacking Iran makes clear that Israel does not trust its “bomb in the basement” to do what nuclear weapons are best at doing: deterring their use by others. Embracing this capability would leave the country much safer.

Why Israel Should Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Bomb

The debate in Jerusalem about attacking Iran makes clear that Israel does not trust its “bomb in the basement” to do what nuclear weapons are best at doing: deterring their use by others. Embracing this capability would leave the country much safer.

(Source: )

July 13th, 2011

Why Food Price Volatility Doesn’t Matter

Policymakers Should Focus Instead on Bringing Costs Down

Export bans, price stabilization schemes, and subsidies for farmers— all policies being proposed to curb the rise in food prices— won’t help those who cannot afford food. The problem is not food price volatility, it is expensive food. Professors Christopher B. Barrett and Marc F. Bellemare, of Cornell and Duke Universities, respectively, suggest an alternative solution.

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